accounts of the wardens of the parish of Morebath, Devon. 1520-1573.
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accounts of the wardens of the parish of Morebath, Devon. 1520-1573.

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Published by J.G. Commin in Exeter .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementTranscribed by the Rev. J. Erskine Binney. With a glossarial index by the Rev. F. W. Weaver.
ContributionsBinney, John Erskine., Weaver, F. W. b. 1853.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA670.D49 D42 vol. 1
The Physical Object
Pagination4 p. l., [1]-256 p.
Number of Pages256
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL176555M
LC Control Numbera 13001117
OCLC/WorldCa5342914

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Full text of "The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. " See other formats. This book, "The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. ", by Eng Morebath, is a replication. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible. This book was created using print-on-demand technology Author: Eng Morebath. Buy The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. - Scholar's Choice Edition by Eng Morebath (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Eng Morebath. The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. Eng Morebath The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. Eng Morebath and inexplicable changes wrought by the Reformation comes through clearly in this remarkable and highly praised account."-Good Book Guide (UK) "[A] vivid piece of.

But from to , through nearly all the drama of the English Reformation, Morebath's only priest, Sir Christopher Trychay, kept the parish accounts on behalf of the churchwardens. Opinionated, eccentric, and talkative, Sir Christopher filled these vivid scripts for parish meetings with the names and doings of his parishioners.3/5(3). Morebath Devon genealogy. Duffy, Eamon. The Voices of Morebath, Yale University Press ().[Based on records from by the parish priest, Sir Christopher Trychay - encompasses the "Prayer Book Rebellion" of and the major changes in the Church from Henry VIII through to 15 years of Elizabeth and how such national events impacted on a small village of 33 families]. All the voices of Tudor Morebath are one voice, caught between the pages of a single book. More than two hundred sets of Churchwardens’ accounts survive from Tudor England, and the accounts of the parish of Morebath, available in print since , are among the best known and most widely used of them.¹ The large quarto manuscript, written on rough but still white rag paper, was bound in. array of professions: book binders, sculptors, joiners, organ repairers, painters, etc. England is especially lucky in that we have more existing churchwardens’ accounts than anywhere else in Europe for the late-fifteenth and early-sixteenth centuries. Accounts such as these present the modern researcher.

  But from to , through nearly all the drama of the English Reformation, Morebath’s only priest, Sir Christopher Trychay, kept the parish accounts on behalf of the churchwardens. Opinionated, eccentric, and talkative, Sir Christopher filled these vivid scripts for parish meetings with the names and doings of his parishioners. 90 The Accounts of the Wardens of the Parish of Morebath, Devon. By John E Binney. 91 Devon Booksellers & Printers in the 17th & 18th Centuries: By John Ingle Dredge 92 Henry de Pomefrey, or, The eve of St. John: a legend of Cornwall and Devon volume 1 By Anna E . The book is an account of the priest of Morebath in Devon from till his death 54 years later in , who ministered to the small farming parish under Henry, Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, using the detailed parish accounts which Trychay himself wrote. The Vicar of Morebath, a parish in Devon on the Somerset border, 25 miles north of Exeter, kept meticulous records from to and Eamon Duffy’s The Voices of Morebath, uses them to provide an unrivalled picture of life in a late medieval parish. Penn and Morebath were remarkably similar: both were 4, acres, mainly sheep country.